Race Info

Medical Advice

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Medical Problems

Discuss any medical problems with your general practitioner (GP). This advice supplements anything he or she says. See your GP if you have a problem that makes it a risk to run in a marathon. We are happy for people with serious medical conditions to run, but only with your GP’s agreement and if you send details of your condition and the treatment you are undergoing. Please send these to me and quote your running number when you know it. Address the envelope to the Marathon Office, mark it ‘Confidential’ and send it to:- Medical Manager Lagos city Marathon

If you have a medical problem that may lead to you having a blackout, such as fits or diabetes, put a cross on the front of your number and write the details, especially your medication, on the reverse of the number.

Cardiac Events & Screening

Runners may very well be unaware when they have a heart problem. Their condition would have been detected if medical advice had been sought and relevant tests carried out. A ‘fitness test’ is not sufficient to detect these problems. If you have a family history of heart disease or sudden death, or you have symptoms of heart disease i.e. chest pain or discomfort on exertion, sudden shortness of breath or rapid palpitations, see your GP who can arrange for you to have a proper cardiac assessment. Such an assessment may not be instantly available, but continuing to run with these symptoms may shorten your running career catastrophically!

Training

Muscular aches and pains occur most commonly after an increase in training. Training should be increased gradually so that you do not suffer prolonged exhaustion and intersperse days of heavy mileage with one or two days of lighter training, so that your body can replace its fuel (muscle glycogen). Rest days are also important.

If you have flu, a feverish cold or a tummy bug, do not train until you have fully recovered. Then start gently and build up gradually. Do not attempt to catch up on lost mileage after illness or injury – this may cause further damage or illness. To reduce injury risk, train on soft surfaces when you can, especially on easy training days. Vary routes, do not always use the same shoes and run on differing cambers, hills, etc. Always face oncoming traffic.

Please do not run on this occasion.

Fluids

Fluids lost in sweat must be replaced otherwise your body becomes dehydrated and less efficient. Alcoholic drinks are dehydrating. A pint of beer produces more than a pint of urine; spirits have a worse effect. Take plenty of non-alcoholic drinks, especially before the race and in hot weather. Thirst is a poor guide to how much you need. Drink enough to keep your urine copious and a pale straw colour. Drink plenty of liquids after training, especially long runs, and drink during races, especially in the first half of a marathon. Practice drinking during longer training runs. Drink plenty of fluids and reduce alcohol intake in the two days before the race.

Diet

Eat what suits you! Large doses of supplementary vitamins and minerals (such as iron) are not essential and produce no benefit if you are on a good mixed diet, but additional vitamin C in small doses is reasonable when fresh fruit and vegetables are in short supply.

Training helps you to sustain a high level of muscle glycogen if you eat a lot of carbohydrate. If you can, eat within two hours of your long runs and the marathon. This helps replace the muscle glycogen quickly and speeds recovery.

Carbo Loading

Do not change your normal diet drastically in the last week before the marathon, but decrease your intake of protein (meat) and increase your intake of carbohydrate (pasta, bread, potatoes, cereals, rice and sweet things), especially for the last three days when you should also be markedly reducing your training. This loads the muscle with glycogen. Unless you reduce your protein intake you will not eat enough carbohydrate. (Not all runners are helped by first depleting carbohydrate with a long run and low carbo diet and then loading – this can make your muscles very heavy).

Clothing

When training in the dark, be seen. Wear white clothing and reflective flashes or bandoliers.

Many runners seek medical treatment for blisters at the start. They had either been training too hard in the final two weeks with ill-fitting shoes, or they had worn a new pair of shoes for the last long training run. Use shoes you know from experience will not give you blisters.

On The Day

Do not run if you feel unwell or have just been unwell. Most medical emergencies occur in people who have been unwell but do not wish to miss the event. If you feel feverish, have been vomiting, have had severe diarrhoea or any chest pains, or otherwise feel unwell, it is unfair to you, your family, your sponsoring charity and the marathon support staff to risk serious illness and become a medical emergency. You are unlikely to do yourself justice. There are many other marathons.

If it is hot, wear loose mesh clothing, start slowly and, if possible, run in the shade. Start the race well hydrated (urine looks pale) and drink whenever you can, especially in the first half of the race when you may not feel thirsty, as you lose a lot of fluid insensibly. This will help you feel better late in the race and may prevent cramp. Cramp is most common in runners who have not trained sufficiently or are dehydrated. Do not gulp large volumes of liquid during or after the race. It is possible to become ill from drinking too much, too quickly.

At The Finish

Do not stand about getting cold. Keep walking, especially if you feel dizzy, and drinking to replace lost liquid, change into warm, dry clothing, and then go to the reunion area.

Keep on drinking and have something to eat. Some runners feel faint more than half-an-hour after finishing the race, often because they have taken insufficient fluid at the finish and/or not eaten anything.

And Finally…

Train sensibly. Follow this simple advice and you will probably not need medical aid. Medical aid posts are located about 20-50 m past the main drink stations and after the finish line. If you drop out, go to an aid station.

Keep this advice and refer to it nearer the day and on marathon eve.

Register for the 2021
Lagos City Marathon

Join us at this edition of the Access Bank Lagos City Marathon 2021. We are looking forward to have you be a part of this wonderful event.

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Become a Lagos 2021
Marathon Volunteer

Whilst volunteering at the Access Bank Lagos City Marathon,
it promises to be fun, exciting and rewarding but definitely not
for the faint-hearted. Though it may be long, tiring plus drain
physically and mentally; yet come rain or shine, we really need
your support as members of the fabulous team to make this a success!

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Explore Lagos, Nigeria's
"center of excellence"

Apart from running the Access Bank Lagos City Marathon, Lagos, Nigeria’s “Centre of Excellence”, an emerging global destination and one of the world’s fastest growing mega city is a haven for fun lovers, shopping; night life and its beautiful beaches are a charm to residents and visitors.

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Find out the route for
runners

The starting point will be at Western Avenue, in front of the National
Stadium Surulere, opposite Teslim Balogun Stadium. The finish will be
in front of Eko Atlantic City, Victoria Island.

Explore routes and maps

ABLCM 2021 COVID 19 MEASURES

 

  • Reduction in the number of participants from over 100,000 to just 300.
  • The international elite runners about 30, the local elite runners 40, and about 200 educated and enlightened fun runners and those that are coming from different parts of the world for Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Qualifiers
  • Cancellation of 10km family fun run which normally attracts over 75, 000 runners. 
  • The Lagos Sports Commission will work with the Office of Lagos State Governor and security agencies to ensure that there is a curfew between 5 am and 10 am on race day.
  • The race will be broadcast live on all television and multi-media channels to ensure people are not on the street to cheer runners, the organizers of the London Marathon adopted a similar approach.
  • All members of the workforce, including volunteers and other auxiliary workers, will undergo a compulsory Covid-19 test.
  • There will be zero entertainment at the finish point
  • Apart from the top three, all other runners will pick their medals at the Marathon Office on designated dates to prevent crowding
  • Security will be tight at the start, the finish, and along the route.
  • There will be passes to screen workers and prevent crowding in several places
  • All runners, workforce, auxiliary workers, security, and others will get a booklet of dos and don’ts of Race during Covid 19 from the office of the General Manager Marathon
  • Apart from the special Media Guide, there will be a special training for our Media Partners on how to cover marathon and road races during Covid-19
  • Massive media campaign to educate the society about the importance of watching from the comfort of their homes.
  • We shall meet with Lagos State Government agencies that are stakeholders to ensure we are all on the same page.
  •  All elite runners will be expected to tender a certificate of clearance from Covid 19 virus not later than 72hrs before their arrival in the country.
  • The start area for the elite field will be floor marked (2m apart) with runners’ number bibs to ensure their standing starting position which will be properly spaced to ensure social distancing.
  • All runners must as a matter of COMPULSION wear a face mask into the start area.
  • There shall be multiple waves at the start to ensure proper spacing of the runners. 
  •  Mist disinfectant sprayers will be mounted at the call area which all runners must pass through after being temperature checked. 
  •  Hygiene stations will be set up at the start and the finish areas.
  • Runners shall be expected to have their face mask on at the start point and must run with it for the next 600m to 800m.
  • All technical officials, volunteers, medical personnel, security, and logistic hands WILL have their face mask on and wear latex hand gloves for the entire duration of the marathon.
  •  All surfaces in all the vehicles that will be used for the marathon WILL be sprayed periodically with disinfectants during the race.
  •  Medical stations at all points WILL be manned and clearly marked with staff donning appropriate PPE wears.
  • The distribution points for the race packs WILL be constructed in a way to ensure proper cross ventilation. Participants WILL leave immediately they are attended to.
  • All volunteers involved in the handling of water and refreshments to the runners WILL be fully masked up with proper PPE wears.
  • All runners will be given a minimum of 3 nose masks and a small bottle of hand sanitizer as well as an instruction leaflet on ways to stay protected from the corona pandemic as part of the contents in the race packs.
  • ONLY runners and the few designated technical hands WIIL be allowed in the start arena.
  • All areas in and around the race venue start and finish WILL be properly disinfected.

 

The above will strictly be followed to ensure the safety of everybody.